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Example: This regular expression: ([Cc][Aa][Ss][Ee]).* would match a line such as Case matches Case but not Case doesn't match c ASE.

A regex can have multiple subgroups, so , , etc can be used to match others (numbers advance left to right with the opening parenthesis of the group).

to get a sophisticated dialogue including a drop down for regular expressions and multi line search/replace.

This tutorial was based on an earlier, far more limited regular expression syntax.

The examples are still the same at the date of writing, they require additions or upgrading to the new ways.

Notepad++ regular expressions use the standard PCRE (Perl) syntax, only departing from it in very minor ways. matches newline", the dot will indeed do that, enabling the "any" character to run over multiple lines. For example, \[ would be interpreted as [ and not as the start of a character set.

Complete documentation on the precise implementation is to be found on the implementer's website. More advanced material, specially about recursion, is to be found on the various pages of Adding the backslash (this is called escaping) works the other way round, as it makes special a character that otherwise isn't. This indicates a set of characters, for example, [abc] means any of the characters a, b or c.

A french Sourceforge user, guy038, made a tutorial available in the French language. For instance, \d stands for "a digit", while "d" is just an ordinary letter. For instance, in Spanish, "ch" is a single letter, though it is written using two characters. This trick also works with symbolic names of control characters, like

A french Sourceforge user, guy038, made a tutorial available in the French language. For instance, \d stands for "a digit", while "d" is just an ordinary letter. For instance, in Spanish, "ch" is a single letter, though it is written using two characters. This trick also works with symbolic names of control characters, like . You can also use ranges, for example [a-z] for any lower case character.

You can use a collating sequence in character ranges, like in [[]-[ (these are collating sequence in Spanish). For example, [^A-Za-z] means any character except an alphabetic character.

Care should be taken with a complement list, as regular expressions are always multi-line, and hence [^ABC]* will match until the first A, B or C (or a, b or c if match case is off), including any newline characters.

To confine the search to a single line, include the newline characters in the exception list, e.g. Note that Unicode categories like in \p{Sc} or \p{Currency_Symbol}, they are flagged as an invalid regex in v6.6.6.

This is because support would draw a large library in, which would have other uses.

Zero or more of the previous group, but minimally: the shortest matching string, rather than the longest string as with the "greedy" * operator. o applied to the text margin-bottom: 0; will match margin-bo, whereas m.*o will match margin-botto.

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